Category Archives: Urban Farming

Fearing Shortages, People Are Planting More Vegetable Gardens

People still struggle to find food at grocery stores during this pandemic, but Jameson Altott is not as worried. He grows more than half the food for his family from his large garden at home, outside Pittsburgh.

“We are lucky to have preserved a lot of food and we still have canned fruits and vegetables and jams and berries in the freezer and meat in the freezer,” Altott says.

There has been a surge of people interested in growing their own food. Oregon State University’s Master Gardener program noticed this, and made their online vegetable gardening course free through the end of April. Their post on Facebook was shared more than 21,000 times.

“We’re being flooded with vegetable orders,” says George Ball, executive chairman of the Burpee Seed Company, based in Warminster, Penn.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/03/27/822514756/fearing-shortages-people-are-planting-more-vegetable-gardens

The therapeutic value of the garden in trying times

If someone were to say I must self-isolate in the garden for the next few weeks, I would shake him or her by the hand. If I could. Here’s a thumbs up from a distance of six feet or more.

The neighborhood sidewalks and nature trails are thronged with the cabin-fevered, so what better place to be outdoors and yet away from others than in your backyard and garden?

You can sit out there with the newspaper and a cup of coffee, but in time both of those pleasures will come to an end.

The mark of a true gardener is a person who does not see a finished landscape but a series of tasks that need to be tackled. This isn’t as onerous as it sounds because it gets to the essential elements of gardening: creativity, honest toil and the satisfaction of a job well done. Aches and pains come along for the ride, but that’s why we have bathtubs.

READ THE FULL POST: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/gardening-self-isolating-coronavirus/2020/03/23/30bae166-6a08-11ea-9923-57073adce27c_story.html

Gardening a great way to stay active when your’re stuck at home

Being stuck at home doesn’t mean you have to stay inside – the current spring weather is perfect for working on the landscape and doing some gardening.

Gardening is a great way to get fresh air, exercise, stay productive, and grow some of your own food.

Herbs, in particular, are great to have in the landscape for many reasons – they are beautiful ornamental plants, attract butterflies and bees, and they can be used for seasoning to make food taste delicious.

Another bonus is that many herbs are deer-resistant!

There are herbs to try for every level of experience, from beginner gardener to advanced.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.gosanangelo.com/story/news/2020/03/22/gardening-great-way-stay-active-when-stuck-home/2884284001/

The History Of Gardens In Times Of Turmoil

Spring weather and extra time at home may have you thinking about putting in or tending to a garden. It’s something past generations always did in times of turmoil. Home gardens provide extra fruits, veggies and herbs when store shelves may be bare.

During both World Wars, the U.S. government encouraged Americans to grow their own food to relieve shortages. Gardening was promoted as a family-friendly activity that provided exercise and stretched food budgets.

With wartime food rationing in 1942, the Oregon Victory Garden Advisory Committee formed to help people grow personal plots of fruits and vegetables. Community groups and government agencies partnered to offer free public classes, they produced and distributed how-to manuals, provided hands-on assistance through home visits, and broadcast gardening information on KOAC radio – later known as Oregon Public Broadcasting.

The coordinated effort worked. All over the state, residents dug up and cultivated their yards, public parks, empty lots and even a portion of the Oregon Zoo.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.opb.org/artsandlife/article/victory-gardens-america-coronavirus-history-oregon/

Gardening column: Big tips on fertilizing your garden

I don’t know if fertilizer is flying off the shelves yet, but I am guessing a few more people might be interested in gardening this year … you know … stocking up!

Growing your own produce is fun and eating it fresh from the garden is rewarding. Growing organically remains popular — so much so that each generation seems to think they invented it!

Regardless whether you garden flowers, veggies or manage turf — using the least amount of inputs is always best.

The two broad groups of garden products are synthetic (human-made), chemical types or organic/natural based chemicals. Both are chemicals.

For example, the chemical composition for bone meal, a natural product can range from 10-30% phosphorus, depending on the type of bones and methods used to process it. Products used as organic fertilizers are usually available separately, so you can mix up your own concoction.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.mankatofreepress.com/news/lifestyles/gardening-column-big-tips-on-fertilizing-your-garden/article_1f83e760-67f8-11ea-998f-9fc94aab9627.html

The nine-year-old American girl who builds houses for the homeless – using all the power tools herself!

A nine-year-old builds houses from scratch and they aren’t the kind for dolls. 

When Hailey Fort was just five-years-old, it broke her heart to see a homeless man on the street. After asking her parents how she could help him, she’s been assisting the homeless by providing food and housing ever since.

Hailey of King Fort, Washington is building a mobile shelter for her homeless friend Edward and others like him. She plans to build 12 this year.

Edward recently lost his job working at the local supermarket and Hailey made it her goal to make sure he could sleep someplace warm and dry.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3111720/Nine-year-old-girl-builds-makeshift-homes-homeless-grows-food-garden.html