Category Archives: Container Gardening

How To Create Classy Container Gardens With Roses

According to the National Gardening Association, 91 million households participated in some form of do-it-yourself lawn and gardening activity, spending an average of $387. Over the past decade, an increasing percentage of this total has gone towards container gardening.

Containers offer a versatile form of gardening that fits into any lifestyle and yard size. City dwellers can use them to brighten up lifeless balconies, roof decks or front stoops, while those with more space can decorate high-traffic spaces and incorporate them into lawn and garden areas for added drama and flair. Because of the multitude of options on the market, container gardens are an easy way to add a splash of color to any outdoor space, big or small.

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Gifting a Winter Container Garden

After all the autumn leaves have been raked away, the garden beds prepared for cold temperatures, and the last crumbs of the pumpkin pie have been gobbled up, the gardeners retreat from their fall miniature gardens and turn their attention to the next few months of winter. With the shorter days come winter plants, winter container gardens, and the bustling holiday season.

Longtime gardeners also know that holiday-time is not the end of gardening. The lifestyle lives on with winter flowering plants, winter container gardens, and miniature gardens that are themed for the season. Another fun part of winter gardening? Gifting. A miniature container garden is not only a unique gift, but it is one that can spark a new hobby and passion for the recipient, who will no doubt appreciate all the time and care you put into their new garden. Read on for some of our favourite tips and tricks when it comes to gifting a winter container garden.

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Understanding Container Gardening

Understanding Container Gardening
Understanding Container Gardening

If you are a garden lover, but have no space for your gardening appetite, don’t worry gardening is not necessarily out of your reach. In the available space of your house say balcony, patio, deck, or sunny window, you can create a container gardening, which will not only bring you joy but also vegetables. So, are you ready to start container gardening yourself

In the past, gardening is an exclusive realm of the landowner. Nowadays even the flat dweller can grow his dream garden without having any fuss. One’s dream can be fulfilled by container gardening, which means the gardening in a special container. Container gardening gives delights of landscape without weekly mowing. In the container, you can raise some perennials, annuals, and even shrubs and small trees.

Don’t think container gardening can be achieved very easily. Container gardening also requires proper planning just like that of traditional gardening. Planning consists of finding your USDA zone (this will help to identify the suitable plant variety of your zone), amount of daylight you are receiving in your apartment, and finally choose your beloved plant variety.

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An Inside Vegetable Garden

Houseplants and herb gardens are well-known as common plants that are grown indoors.
But they are not the only plants that can be grown indoors. By using the right containers
and having the ability to mimic the ideal growing conditions you can also have an indoor
vegetable garden. The benefits of having one go beyond the beautification of your home
or the relaxation you get from gardening, but you can also pick your own vegetables right
in your kitchen.

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Garden Planter

Garden Planter is a small pot or container used for growing small plants or trees. Garden Planters are stunning outdoor accessories that takes care of your actual garden or outdoor space. Garden Planters provide solution to plant lovers who do not have enough garden space. Garden Planters allow plantation anywhere in different styles shapes and sizes. Square, Rectangular or circular garden planters are there to suit different space area and different plant types viz., small trees to medium plants. Even hang-off garden planters are also available. With garden planters an artificial garden can be created even at the roof top.

Selection of Garden planters is most important. Quality material with nicely crafted garden planters must be selected as it did not require replacement at later point of time. Garden Planters with good wooden material like teak, cedar, Redwood, synthetic material like polymer and granite or marble is durable and elegant. Wooden and Granite Garden planers are natural and beautiful. They withstand tuff weather conditions and monsoon seasons. Garden Planters can be selected taking into account whether the container will survive mid-day sun, breezes and can hold moisture and should not dry out immediately. Terracotta Planters dry out very fast while wood and metal garden planters retain water unless there is provision for water drain. Fiberglass Planters are very light weight, mobile but not durable.

Popular kind of outdoor planters is terracotta planter pottery. These clay planters are natural in color and well suited to the greenery in the garden. Terracotta garden planters can be painted, glazed or engraved designs. Pottery Planter designs can be arranged nicely like Linear (stripes, checks), Geometric shapes, Floral. Ceramic Planters come out with beautiful colors, designs and textures. Ceramic normally contains moisture and this will be useful for plants thrive on moisture. Ceramic planters are light weight and can be hanged on wall. Hanging Planters also called suspended gardens adorn house decor. Plants in hanging planters at ceilings, windows walls add beauty to the garden or living place. Patio Planters act as a bridge between garden and home and is very decorative.
Garden Planters are very important accessories for garden art. Garden Planters also indoor and outdoor herb gardening. Growing fresh herbs for day to day use in cooking is made possible by garden planters. When it comes to making your own garden art, there are so many different possibilities as to what you can do that it can almost be overwhelming. That is why I am going to focus on just one type of garden art in this article: planters. Check out these fun and unique ideas for your garden pots and planters:
Bonsai Garden can be created by using garden planters. Bonsai trees are very popular and bonsai garden provides peace and relaxation over the years. Garden Planters should support the type of bonsai trees grown.
When selecting the outdoor planters for your bonsai tree, you need to keep in mind the overall impact it is supposed to have, little to none. The outdoor planters are not what you are trying to show off. They are simply the vessels that are supporting the bonsai trees that you are raising. That means the outdoor planters you choose should not be showy or over the top. Instead they should be natural looking pieces that add to the overall effect of the tree in them.

Plant Flower Bulbs For Beautiful Container Gardening

As a group,flower bulbs are outstanding plants colorful, showy, and generally easy to grow for container gardening. Many have evergreen foliage; with others, the leaves ripen after flowering and the bulbs are stored and started again, year after year. Some flower bulbs are hardy, others, tender, though what is, and is not hardy, in a particular area is a matter of winter temperature averages. In cold regions, tender tuberous begonias, gloxinias, and calla lilies can be treated like summer in container gardens. This gives the gardener a wide variety to grow from earliest spring to late fall.

Dutch flower bulbs include crocus, snowdrops, eranthis or winter aconites, chionodoxas, scillas, grape hyacinths, leucojums or snowflakes, Dutch hyacinths, daffodils, and tulips, the pride of northern spring gardens. Though hardy, they are not adapted to garden containers outdoors where temperatures drop much below freezing. They require the protection of a shed, unheated cellar or cold frame. Gardening Pots can also be dug into a trench in the ground for the winter and covered with a thick blanket of marsh hay or straw. Where temperatures do not go below freezing, Dutch flower bulbs can be left outdoors in gardening pots over the winter.

For best results in a container garden, start with fresh, firm, large-sized flower bulbs each fall. Insure good drainage in the bottom of each garden pot and use a light soil with bone meal added. If in clay pots, plunge during the rooting period in damp peat moss to prevent rapid drying out. If this occurs too often, roots will be injured and flowers will be poor. When weather permits, after the danger of freezing passes, put your container garden outside where they are to flower or in a nursery row until they reach the bud stage. After blooming, move your container garden where foliage can ripen unseen.

For fragrance, concentrate on Dutch hyacinths, excellent for bedding large planter boxes or raised beds. Daffodils look well grouped around trees or large shrubs, as birches and forsythias. Tulips, formal in character, combine delightfully with pansies, violas, wall flowers, forget-me-nots, marguerites, English daisies, and annual candytuft in container gardens.

As already indicated, in cold areas, Dutch flower bulbs cannot be potted or planted in small window boxes and left outdoors unprotected for the winter. They can, however, be set out in large planters and boxes, deep and wide enough to contain plenty of soil. The garden pots should be one and a half to two feet deep and about two feet wide. Set flower bulbs, with at least six inches of soil above them, planting them early enough in the fall so that they can make root growth before soil freezes hard. In penthouse gardens in New York City, Dutch bulbs have been grown successfully in this way, but it is always a risk. It makes no difference whether garden pots are made of wood, concrete, or other material; it is the amount of soil they hold that counts.

Actually, it is not the freezing of the soil that injures flower bulbs (this occurs in open ground), but it is the pressure and counter pressure exerted by frost on the sides of containers, which are firm and do not give. As a result, flower bulbs are bruised and thrust out of the soil, their roots torn. Where there is no hard freeze, but sufficient cold weather, hardy flower bulbs can be grown successfully in garden containers of small size.

Here is a partial list of flower bulbs that thrive in container gardens. They will help you with your container garden design

Achimenes are warmth-loving trailing plants with neat leaves and tubular flowers in blue, lavender, red and white. Related to gloxinias and African violets, they are nice in hanging baskets and window boxes or in garden pots on tables, shelves, or wall brackets. Start the small tubers indoors and give plants a sheltered spot with protection from strong sun and wind. Achimenes, an old standby in the South, is worthy of more frequent planting.

Agapanthus or Blue Lily of the Nile is a fleshy-rooted evergreen plant, with strap leaves, often grown in tubs and urns on terraces and steps during the summer, when the tall blue spikes unfold. Culture is easy, but plants require a well-lighted, frost proof room or greenhouse in winter. This is an old-time favorite, often seen in the gardens of Europe. It is a perfect flower bulb for container gardening.

The Calla Lily is Showy, and outdoors in warmer regions, but a tender pot plant in the North. Most familiar is the white one with large, shiny, heart-shaped leaves. Start bulbs indoors in February or March in rich soil and, when weather settles, transfer to large gardening pots and take outdoors. Calla lilies do well in full sun or part shade, are heavy feeders and need much water. There is also a dainty yellow one with white-spotted leaves. Rest your flower bulbs after foliage ripens and grow again.

Colorful and free-flowering Dahlias provide bounteous cut blooms. Tall, large-flowering kinds can be grown only in large planters and boxes, but the dwarfs, even freer flowering, are excellent in small garden containers. Attaining one to two feet tall, they grow easily from tubers in average soil in sun or part shade. They may also be raised from seed sown indoors in February. If tubers are stored in peat or sand in a cool, frost proof place, they can be grown for years. Check bulbs during winter, and if shriveling, sprinkle lightly.

Gladiolus, the summer-flowering plant has spear like leaves and many hued spikes. Corms can be planted in garden containers outdoors after danger of frost is passed. Set them six inches apart and four to six inches deep. The best way to use these in container gardening is to planting a few every two to three weeks, giving you a succession of bloom in your container garden. Stake stems before flowers open. After the leaves turn brown, or there is a frost, lift corms, cut off foliage and dust with DDT to control the tiny sucking thrips. After dusting, store corms in a dry place at 45 to 55 degrees F for future planting.

Gloxinias, another Summer-flowering plant and tender with large, tubular blooms of red, pink, lavender, purple, or white, and broad velvety rosettes of leaves. Start tubers indoors and don’t take outside until weather is warm. Since the leaves are easily broken or injured by wind or rain, put plants in a sheltered spot. The low broad eaves of contemporary houses, with restricted sun, offer an appropriate setting for rows of pots or window boxes filled with gay gloxinias.

Now you have some great ideas for your container garden design. It’s time now to start planting your flower bulbs.

Happy Container Gardening!

Copyright © 2006 Mary Hanna All Rights Reserved.

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