Category Archives: Frontpage

This Chicago Chef Used to Charge $250 a Meal. Now She’s Feeding People in Need for Free

In Mid-March, Ibraheem came up with a free food delivery concept she called Kids with Coworkers, a riff on all the children who were now stuck at home with their parents (i.e. coworkers). Her goal was to cook and deliver “farm-to-fork” meals to needy families across Chicago. Many of the parents she knew in her community were furloughed or laid off from their jobs and were stuck at home tending to children without a safety net for their family.

“I’m living two different lives,” she says. “I feel like I’m in two Americas.”

In late March, as the entire city sheltered in place, she began daily deliveries of freshly made dinners to nine families. Local sponsors learned about the program on social media. One foundation’s executive asked her to write the amount of money she needed to run the program on a napkin, snap a photo of the number and text it over, so the nonprofit could get the money to her quickly. “People started to say: We see what you’re doing. How can we help you?” she says.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://time.com/nextadvisor/opinion/meet-q-ibraheem/

Whatever You Do, Don’t Put Coffee Grounds in Your Garden

There’s nothing like eating veggies you grew in your own garden. But gardening is a big investment: there’s the daily watering, the careful pest control, and the delicate process of keeping the soil chemistry just right. The internet is full of ways you can make gardening easier and cheaper, but some methods are too good to be true. No matter what the gardening blogs tell you, leave the spent coffee grounds alone. They’re bad news for your garden.

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In A Time Of Uncertainty, Bostonians Embrace Their Community Gardens

In Dorchester, where the clatter of a passing train gives way to the scrape of a rake, the Greenwood Street Community Garden is thriving. It’s one of roughly 175 community gardens scattered like jewels through the city of Boston. And at this time of pandemic and social upheaval, these gardens are being treasured.

On a recent sunny day, retired teacher Barry Lawton separated his corn stalks, while gently singing Marvin Gaye’s “Mercy, Mercy Me.” He catalogued the variety coaxed from his narrow plot.

“I am growing potatoes, red and white melons, cantaloupe, watermelon, five different types of lettuce. Red, yellow and green peppers, corn, as you can see, cucumbers,” Lawton said. “And I’m waiting for the asparagus, the broccoli and the spinach, they just haven’t showed up yet.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://www.wgbh.org/news/local-news/2020/07/09/in-a-time-of-uncertainty-bostonians-embrace-their-community-gardens

Camp Washington residents create a brighter future

Photos: Gary Kessler

Camp Washington is a little rough around the edges. That’s obvious from a casual drive-by perspective.

But what if this disenfranchised, low-income neighborhood isn’t as “poor” as it seems?

The neighborhood is gritty and quirky. And the running themes throughout Camp Washington are opportunity and productivity. Residents who are willing to dig in and invest themselves will see the fruit of their investments.

It’s a place where there are still opportunities for ownership and entrepreneurship. It’s a place where relational capital and creativity go a long way.

This post-industrial Cincinnati neighborhood has weathered some difficult years. But the neighborhood, collectively, already has everything it needs to survive and thrive for another hundred.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.soapboxmedia.com/features/OTG-Camp-Washington-community-creates-brighter-future.aspx

‘Plan bee’ for cities: report sows seeds for pollinator-friendly urban areas

New study reveals the importance of cities for pollinators and highlights how to attract bees and other insects to urban areas

It is well documented that access to parks, gardens and forests is good for our mental health. One study, by Denmark’s University of Aarhus, found that children who grew up without regular access to green spaces were up to 55 per cent more likely to develop depression and other psychiatric disorders than those who grow up with it.

But creating oases in our cities isn’t just beneficial for human health. New research published by the scientific journal Plos One, suggests that urban gardens, parks and roadside verges play a vital role in boosting bee and other pollinator numbers thanks to their diversity of blooming plants and absence of pesticides.

The report – titled, A Plan Bee for Cities – identified urban community gardens as particularly beneficial to insects due to the diversity of seasonal flowers. Researchers found that pollinator numbers in the urban gardens they studied were comparable to rural sites they looked at – and significantly higher than other green spaces such as parks.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.positive.news/environment/conservation/report-highlights-how-to-attract-bees/

‘Plan bee’ for cities: report sows seeds for pollinator-friendly urban areas

New study reveals the importance of cities for pollinators and highlights how to attract bees and other insects to urban areas

It is well documented that access to parks, gardens and forests is good for our mental health. One study, by Denmark’s University of Aarhus, found that children who grew up without regular access to green spaces were up to 55 per cent more likely to develop depression and other psychiatric disorders than those who grow up with it.

But creating oases in our cities isn’t just beneficial for human health. New research published by the scientific journal Plos One, suggests that urban gardens, parks and roadside verges play a vital role in boosting bee and other pollinator numbers thanks to their diversity of blooming plants and absence of pesticides.

The report – titled, A Plan Bee for Cities – identified urban community gardens as particularly beneficial to insects due to the diversity of seasonal flowers. Researchers found that pollinator numbers in the urban gardens they studied were comparable to rural sites they looked at – and significantly higher than other green spaces such as parks.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.positive.news/environment/conservation/report-highlights-how-to-attract-bees/