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Companion Planting

Companion plantings of some kind have been practised throughout agricultural history. Some of the earliest written documents on gardening discuss these relationships. Early settlers discovered American First Nations people were using an inter-planting scheme of corn-bean-squash that balanced the requirements of each crop for light, water, and nutrients. In the 1800ís, hemp (cannabis) was often planted around a cabbage field to keep away the white cabbage butterflies in Holland. In many parts of the world today, subsistence farmers and organic gardeners grow two or more crops simultaneously in a given area to achieve a certain benefit.

Companion planting is the practice of locating particular plants near one another because they enhance plant growth, discourage pests and diseases, or have some other beneficial effect. When selecting your companion plants consider more than which pests are deterred. Think about what each plant adds or takes away from the soil and what effect the proximity of strong herbs may have on the flavour of your vegetables. Avoid placing two heavy feeders or two shallow rooted plant types near each other.

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What Is Companion Planting All About?

Mediterranean gardeners have regularly put basil and tomatoes together in the kitchen as lovely as in the garden. Many people agree with that the odours from the aromatic oils produced in basil leaves assist in repelling bugs that might otherwise bother the tomato plants. This may additionally or may also now not be so, however planting them close to each other is merely an excellent way to combine two tasty crops.

When it comes to the science of associate planting, it is difficult to prove any exact reason and effect relationships. Life in the garden is a little unique each year, so it is nearly impossible to replicate the precise growing stipulations from one year to the next. One aspect is specific: you should arrange the vegetables in your beds to avoid opposition for house and sunlight.

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Zucchini: A Power House of Nutrition

Zucchini: A Power House of Nutrition
Zucchini: A Power House of Nutrition

Dating back to 7000 B. C., zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) is native to Central and South America. Sometimes called by the nickname Italian Squash, zucchini was brought to North America by its southern neighbours. Early European explorers introduced zucchini to Italy and other countries in Europe. Italians initially grew zucchini for their sweet, edible blossoms, later the hearty fruits were experimented with producing the delectable dishes that resulted in zucchini being dubbed Italian squash. Up until the 20th Century, most Americans considered zucchini a treat reserved for eating on special occasions and were store-bought instead of grown in gardens.

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