How To Create Classy Container Gardens With Roses

According to the National Gardening Association, 91 million households participated in some form of do-it-yourself lawn and gardening activity, spending an average of $387. Over the past decade, an increasing percentage of this total has gone towards container gardening.

Containers offer a versatile form of gardening that fits into any lifestyle and yard size. City dwellers can use them to brighten up lifeless balconies, roof decks or front stoops, while those with more space can decorate high-traffic spaces and incorporate them into lawn and garden areas for added drama and flair. Because of the multitude of options on the market, container gardens are an easy way to add a splash of color to any outdoor space, big or small.

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Top 5 Damaging Insects Homeowners Need to Watch for on Trees and Shrubs

Top-5-Damaging-Insects-You-need-to-look-for-on-trees-and-shrubs
Top-5-Damaging-Insects-You-need-to-look-for-on-trees-and-shrubs

When damaging insects attack a tree or shrub, pest control by an ISA Certified Arborist may be required. It’s important for homeowners to know the signs of some of the most destructive insects in the Philadelphia area. The experts at Giroud Tree & Lawn share the Top 5 Damaging Insects that homeowners need to look for right now on trees & shrubs.

Eastern Tent Caterpillars
There’s no mistaking these creepy crawlies by the signature tent-like webs, which are constructed in the crotches of tree branches. Eastern Tent Caterpillars have a taste for a wide variety of trees, so homeowners need to be on the lookout in spring time for signs of an infestation.
Not only are the webs unsightly, Eastern Tent Caterpillars can severely defoliate a tree. Defoliation will weaken the tree, making it more susceptible to invasion by secondary pests and diseases. Treatment for these caterpillars is most critical early in the season.

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Planting Fruit Trees For Your Garden

Fruit trees bear at different times of the year. For example, there are apples for early season, mid-season, and late season (well into fall), so it is wise to select trees for the season you want. Just how long it will be before trees will bear is another consideration; apples and pears bear in 4 to 6 years; plums, cherries, and peaches bear in about 4 years.

Besides considering bearing season and length of bearing, you should also think of size. In addition to standard-sized fruit trees there are dwarf varieties that grow only a few feet. There are also different kinds of apples, peaches, or cherries; your local nursery will tell you about these. Your nursery also stocks the type of trees that do best in your area, so ask for advice. Your trees must be hardy enough to stand the coldest winter and the hottest summer in your vicinity.

Many varieties of fruit trees are self-sterile, which means that they will not set a crop unless other blossoming trees are nearby to furnish pollen. Some fruit trees are self-pollinating or fruiting and need no other tree. When you buy your fruit trees, ask about this. Fruit trees are beautiful just as decoration, but you also want fruits to eat.

Buy from local nurseries if possible, and look for 1- or 2-yearold trees. Stone fruits are usually 1 year old and apples and pears are generally about 2 years old at purchase time. Select stocky and branching trees rather than spindly and compact ones because espaliering requires a well-balanced tree.

Whether you buy from a local nursery or from a mail-order source (and this is fine too), try to get the trees into the ground as quickly as possible. Leaving a young fruit tree lying around in hot sun can kill it. If for some reason you must delay the planting time, heel in the tree. This is temporary planting: dig a shallow trench wide enough to receive the roots, set the plants on their sides, cover the roots with soil, and water them. Try to keep new trees out of blazing sun and high winds.

Prepare the ground for the fruit trees with great care. Do not just dig a hole and put the tree in. Fruit trees do require some extra attention to get them going. Work the soil a few weeks before planting. Turn it over and poke it. You want a friable workable soil with air in it, a porous soil. Dry sandy soil and hard clay soil simply will not do for fruit trees, so add organic matter to existing soil. This organic matter can be compost (bought in tidy sacks) or other humus.

Plant trees about 10 to 15 feet apart in fall or spring when the land is warm. Then hope for good spring showers and sun to get the plants going. Dig deep holes for new fruit trees, deep enough to let you set the plant in place as deep as it stood in the nursery. (Make sure you are planting trees in areas that get sun.) Make the diameter of the hole wide enough to hold the roots without crowding. When you dig the hole, put the surface soil to one side and the subsoil on the other so that the richer top soil can be put back directly on the roots when you fill in the hole. Pack the soil in place firmly but not tightly. Water plants thoroughly but do not feed. Instead, give the tree an application of vitamin B12 (available at nurseries) to help it recover from transplanting.

Place the trunk of the fruit tree about 12 to 18 inches from the base of the trellis; you need some soil space between the tree and the wood. Trellises may be against a fence or dividers or on a wall. Young trees need just a sparse pruning. Tie branches to the trellis with tie-ons or nylon string, not too tightly but firmly enough to keep the branch flat against the wood. As the tree grows, do more trimming and tying to establish the espalier pattern you want.

To attach the trellis to a wall use wire or some of the many gadgets available at nurseries specifically for this purpose. For a masonry wall, rawl plugs may be placed in the mortared joints, and screw eyes inserted. You will need a carbide drill to make holes in masonry.

Caring for fruit trees is not difficult. Like all plants, fruit trees need a good soil (already prepared), water, sun, and some protection against insects. When trees are actively growing, start feeding with fruit tree fertilizer (available at nurseries). Use a weak solution; it is always best to give too little rather than too much because excess fertilizer can harm trees.

Observe trees frequently when they are first in the ground because this is the time when trouble, if it starts, will start. If you see leaves that are yellow or wilted, something is awry. Yellow leaves indicate that the soil may not contain enough nutrients. The soil could lack iron, so add some iron chelate to it. Wilted leaves could mean that water is not reaching the roots or insects are at work.

Lawn Care Maintenance For Mere Mortals

Though everyone likes to see their lawn in an enviable condition few are aware of the basics of lawn preparation and maintenance. Planting the seeds, spraying for the weeds, and watering your lawn, all look simple but proper maintenance of a good lawn is no simple task. To some, lawn care is serious business – reading every bit of the literature that they come across and going for a serious lawn building exercise that may make this interesting past time a rudimentary daily routine.

Lawn care and maintenance is more of an enjoyable past time rather than a core activity. Consider these basics of healthy lawn care. While talking about lawns the first thing to consider is mowing. The frequency of mowing, the growth of the grass, and the lawn movers are all integral part in deciding a good mowing habit. Quite often small opening up of the soil leaving more space for the lawn to breathe would accelerate healthy growth of the grass. The lawn is to be sufficiently watered especially during large dry spells of summer to sustain the growth of the grass. Lawns need a good supplement of a proper mix of fertilizers with adequate nitrogen phosphate and potash.

If we go a bit technical, lawns require more than one annual feed. The feed for the summer need contain a nitrogen rich fertilizer where as an autumn feed should be rich in phosphate and potash with an adequate supplement of worm killers and disease resistance. For watering, the coolest time of the day, either in the morning or in the evening is advisable, the frequency being once a week.

A good lawn care management program includes proper weed control besides appropriate mowing and application of fertilizers. The basic mowing lesson includes use of sharp blades and regular mowing from March to October. Care should be taken not to move the mower backwards and forwards. In the case of new lawns, the first thing to be considered is to prepare a smooth and level ground by a tractor and box blade. As regards sowing the seeds they need spread in two directions preferably with a rotary spreader. The seeds are to be planted around thirty days in advance. Depending upon the temperature the seed suitable for hot season or for the cold spell may be selected. A healthy lawn requires more or less an inch of water during a week. Further aerating in spring is considered best for the lawns. The recent trend in the lawn care is the use of the organic fertilizers. These are environmental friendly and harmless to the plants. Literature on organic fertilizers is plentiful on the market. The cost of the organic fertilizers is almost the same that of the chemical fertilizers but the benefit stays longer.

The type of lawn care depends on oneís budget. One can afford to spend thousands of dollars should the lawn making is taken as a serious hobby. If, on the other, hand one needs a well maintained lawn to spend a few hours with family and friends the same may not cost much.

Lawn Care Tips And Proper Lawn Maintenance

How much does the average person know about proper lawn maintenance? It may surprise you that the average person is fairly ignorant when it comes to properly caring for their lawn. Sure they can spray for weeds, and use big name lawn equipment, but what do they really know? Proper maintenance of one’s lawn is much more than this. It enthralls taking what one already knows and tweaking it with new technique and knowledge. Once this type of mind set is reached only then can your lawn start to separate from the average run of the mill lawn. Watering your lawn is very easy and therefore common knowledge, but seeding and proper weeding may not be as readily known. Study everything you can find about lawn maintenance and become a student of this necessary past time.

When you take it to the next lawn care level as far as reading tips and tricks then you are ready to start applying them to your own lawn. It does no good to learn many wonderful and exciting tricks dealing with your grass if you are not going to take the first step. Start off slow in order to not burn yourself out then gradually build. In other words, you may not want to go out and purchase a bunch of expensive lawn equipment right off the bat. If you decide that you do not have an interest in lawn care then you will be stuck trying to sell name brand equipment at a discounted rate. Also, you may not want to over think things when it comes to your lawn. Too many times I have seen people get so far into the science behind lawn care to where lawn maintenance becomes more of a chore then past time.

Lastly and most importantly, have fun with what you learn. Do not be so regimented that you loose sight of your goal. This goal is of course having a beautiful yard full of life. This will give you the satisfaction of creating something from scratch and making it wonderful. Tips such as these can be found at www.lawn-care-guru.com along with many other insightful bits of information. Have fun and enjoy your new outlook on lawn care.

Lawn Care FAQ

Q: How often should I cut my lawn
A: As part of quality lawn care, regular cutting with a mower should be observed and the grass should be cut to an even height. Cutting your lawn once per week should be sufficient.

Q: What is the purpose of raking my lawn?
A: This is commonly done in order to remove dead grass. Many people only rake their lawn in the fall as the leaves begin to cover their yard, but a part of effective lawn care requires that lawns by raked during other seasons as well.

Q: Does lawn care require that I water my lawn?
A: Not everyone does this, but it is recommended that lawns be watered in order to avoid having the grass to dry up and turn brown. If this happens, you could be left with brown spots in your yard.

Q: I have a dog and he is reeking havoc on the yard. How can I replant my lawn with success?
A: Dogs and lawn care are not the best match, but they can work together. When you replant your lawn, consider using seeds that are specifically designed for high traffic areas. Other factors that may worsen the effect that your dog is having on the lawn may include a chain dragging the grass and exposing the dirt surface below or if your dog is prone to digging.

Q: Should I use harsh chemicals on my lawn in order to rid it of pests and insects?
A: Many experts agree that this is a bad idea for several reasons. If you have children who play in the yard, this may be unhealthy for them. The same is true of pets, who make it a habit of digging or even eating grass at times. In addition, harsh chemicals often do more harm than good to your lawn and are certainly no friend of the environment. Instead, try a bug light or other means of ridding your lawn of insects and other pests.

Lawn care is a very big industry, which services millions of people every year. Whether you do not have the time to care for the lawn yourself or simply aren’t up to the task, there are a number of landscaping experts that are readily available to help with lawn care needs. These are commonly found in the yellow pages under landscaping and most businesses can provide you with an instant quote over the telephone if you have detailed information regarding your specific lawn care needs.